Mark J. Holterman, Medical

The Potential of Regenerative Medicine to Restore Organ Function

 

Dr. Mark J. Holterman pic
Dr. Mark J. Holterman
Image: osfhealthcare.org

Dr. Mark Holterman, a longtime advocate of regenerative medicine and stem cell therapy, serves as pediatrics professor at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria. Reflecting decades of research employing ethically sourced fetal stem cells, Mark J. Holterman, MD, seeks to promote the academic study of the safety and efficacy of innovative treatment modalities.

An emerging area of medical science, regenerative medicine at its foundation centers on restoring the functionality of organs and tissues, specifically those that have been damaged or are associated with chronic disease and severe injuries that do not respond to conventional therapies. Restoration of function is enabled through a combination of tissue engineering and gene editing advancements, which allows stem cells to be remodeled as three-dimensional tissue structures and organoids that meet highly specific needs.

Enabling this is the potentially limitless ability of stem cells to divide and transdifferentiate into a variety of cell types. As such, stem cells provide a foundation for the body’s full range of organs and tissues. Employing microengineering and cell transplantation techniques, organoids are grown that have the potential to take the place of donated organs and tissues, which are of limited supply and expensive.

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Mark J. Holterman, Medical

21st Century Cures Act Supports Regenerative Medicine

 

21st Century Cures Act pic
21st Century Cures Act
Image: sciencemag.org

Mark Holterman, MD, a pediatric surgeon, has served as a member of the general surgical team at Children’s Hospital at OSF Healthcare since 2011. He is additionally a professor in the Division of Pediatric Surgery at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria. Dr. Mark Holterman, CEO of regenerative medicine-focused Mariam Global Health, maintains a strong interest in the development of cell-based therapies.

In late 2016, the United States Congress passed and President Obama signed the 21st Century Cures Act. This legislation, the result of bi-partisan alliances in Congress, was designed to help patients with serious health conditions benefit from the fast-tracking of new drugs and medical devices. It also channels new funds into medical research. In addition to its $2 billion designated over a two-year period to fight the American opioid epidemic, and other provisions, the law provides greater support to the field of regenerative medicine.

The act builds on the Food and Drug Administration’s recent practice of incorporating the input of patients into the agency’s drug approval procedures. Thus, it provides for a quicker and more efficient FDA approval process for certain stem cell treatments before they enter the market. The membership of groups such as the World Stem Cell Summit and the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine applauded the new legislation.