Mark J. Holterman, Medical

The Potential of Regenerative Medicine to Restore Organ Function

 

Dr. Mark J. Holterman pic
Dr. Mark J. Holterman
Image: osfhealthcare.org

Dr. Mark Holterman, a longtime advocate of regenerative medicine and stem cell therapy, serves as pediatrics professor at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria. Reflecting decades of research employing ethically sourced fetal stem cells, Mark J. Holterman, MD, seeks to promote the academic study of the safety and efficacy of innovative treatment modalities.

An emerging area of medical science, regenerative medicine at its foundation centers on restoring the functionality of organs and tissues, specifically those that have been damaged or are associated with chronic disease and severe injuries that do not respond to conventional therapies. Restoration of function is enabled through a combination of tissue engineering and gene editing advancements, which allows stem cells to be remodeled as three-dimensional tissue structures and organoids that meet highly specific needs.

Enabling this is the potentially limitless ability of stem cells to divide and transdifferentiate into a variety of cell types. As such, stem cells provide a foundation for the body’s full range of organs and tissues. Employing microengineering and cell transplantation techniques, organoids are grown that have the potential to take the place of donated organs and tissues, which are of limited supply and expensive.

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Mark J. Holterman, Medical

Cellular Therapy FAQs

 

Alliance for the Advancement of Cellular Therapies pic
Alliance for the Advancement of Cellular Therapies
Image: aact.co

Mark Holterman, MD, PhD, teaches surgery and pediatrics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. As a cofounder of the Alliance for the Advancement of Cellular Therapies (AACT), Dr. Mark Holterman promotes the safe and ethical advancement of regenerative medicine and stem-cell therapies. The following addresses some frequently asked questions about cellular therapies.

Q: What are cellular therapies?

A: Cellular therapy (CT) entails transplanting human cells to enhance the body’s ability to fight disease and restore tissue and cells. When the body is injured, its adult stem cells activate, traveling to the site of the injury and giving signals to start the healing process. With age, the number of these cells decreases. However, with CT, stem cells are taken from bone marrow or fat and implanted at the injured or diseased site when there is an inadequate supply.

Q: For what diseases can cellular therapies be used?

A: Some diseases that cellular therapies may be used for are osteoarthritis and joint pain, autoimmune disorders, alopecia, and psoriasis.

Q: Are cellular therapies ethical?

A: There are no ethical issues involved in adult stem-cell therapy since they are not embryonic stem cells.

Mark J. Holterman, Medical

CellR4 – Journal for Cellular Therapies

 

CellR4pic
CellR4
Image: CellR4.org

A pediatrics and surgical professor at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, Mark Holterman, MD, holds board positions with multiple medical organizations. Dr. Mark Holterman also is a cofounder of the Alliance for the Advancement of Cellular Therapies (AACT) and serves on its executive board. The AACT collaborates with the CellR4 medical journal to publish research presented at AACT conferences.

The official journal of the Cure Alliance, CellR4 focuses on studies and medical knowledge regarding cellular repair, regeneration, reprogramming, and differentiation. The journal facilitates discussion on challenges and opportunities involved in developing new treatments. Published content includes information on fundamental new discoveries in basic science and the delivery of innovative therapies to transitional and clinical trials. Additionally, CellR4 shares information on global collaborative efforts and features commentaries and opinion papers on legal, ethical, and regulatory issues.

CellR4’s articles are available for full download at no charge on its website.

Mark J. Holterman, Medical

Research Awards at the American Diabetes Association

 

Research Awards pic
Research Awards
Image: professional.diabetes.org

Mark Holterman, MD, has worked for more than two decades building a career as an accomplished researcher and medical practitioner. Before taking on his current role as professor of surgery and pediatrics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, Dr. Mark Holterman received the Innovative Research Award from the American Diabetes Association  (ADA).

Over the last six decades, ADA has supported nearly 5,000 research initiatives in the field of diabetes through grant funding and dedicated research programming. The Core Research Program is one such avenue through which the organization supports diabetes researchers. In 2017, ADA recognized groundbreaking study in this field with its two Innovative Research Awards.

ADA’s Innovative Basic Science (IBS) Award helps fund work in the field of diabetes etiology and the challenges it poses to treatment efforts. The award gives special consideration to those researchers who are either working on early-stage studies or are poised to make great impact with their work. At the most, the IBS Award provides $115,000 in funding each year for a maximum of three years.

Another Core Program award is the Innovative Clinical or Translational Science (ICTS) Grant, which can supply faculty researchers with up to $200,000 in annual funding over a three-year period. This award focuses primarily on researchers who have applied their medical theories in clinical applications that use humans as research subjects.

Community Outreach, Mark J. Holterman

Volunteering with IPSAC-VN

 

IPSAC-VN pic
IPSAC-VN
Image: ipsacvietnam.org

Dr. Mark Holterman, an accomplished medical researcher, practitioner, and educator, splits his time between such roles as professor at the University of Illinois and as CEO of Mariam Global Health. Dedicated to helping patients in a variety of ways, Mark Holterman, MD, supports such charitable organizations as the International Pediatric Specialists Alliance for the Children of Vietnam (IPSAC-VN).

To continue helping healthcare professionals in Vietnam improve access to pediatric surgical care and increase their capacity for such care, IPSAC-VN relies on the support of donors and volunteers.

Volunteers offer the most hands-on support of the organization by providing patient care, training, lecturing, and surgery at affiliate medical schools and hospitals in Vietnam. All volunteers must possess a visa and passport that is valid for at least six months after the date of the trip. In addition to this information, medical volunteers must provide the organization with a copy of their professional license and CV.

Once volunteers are accepted, IPSAC-VN suggests that they purchase travel medicine insurance and recommend that they travel to their determined destination at least two days before they are scheduled to start their volunteering. Team debrief is held before the start date and after the end date, and volunteers are responsible for travel, hotel, and other expenses once in Vietnam.

Mark J. Holterman, Medical

ADA and APA Join Hands in Training Mental Health Professionals

 

ADA and APA  pic
ADA and APA
Image: professional.diabetes.org

Mark Holterman, MD received his degree in medicine and immunology from the University of Virginia. He currently serves as a professor of surgery and pediatrics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. Dr. Mark Holterman is a member of several professional organizations including the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

Founded in 1940, ADA is a leading non-profit organization that concentrates on conducting research, education, and advocacy activities related to the treatment, prevention, and cure of diabetes. The organization sponsors several programs to support its mission, some of which are collaborative efforts with other organization. One of these programs is the Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program, a joint effort with the American Psychological Association.

The program aims to serve the need for mental health professionals who are willing to cater to the psychosocial challenges associated with diabetes management. It is a two-part continuing education program that requires interested practitioners to complete a seven-hour face-to-face seminar and a five-hour online course. Upon successful completion of the courses, providers will be listed on the ADA website which can be freely accessed by those seeking treatment. This program launched in June of this year and has recently received a $839-million grant from the Helmsley Charitable Trust.

Mark J. Holterman, Medical

The American Diabetes Association’s Two Research Awards

 

American Diabetes Association pic
American Diabetes Association
Image: diabetes.org

Mark Holterman, MD, has practiced pediatric surgery and studied regenerative medicine for several years. The CEO of Mariam Global Health, he splits his time between medical research, teaching surgery at the University of Illinois, and providing pediatric care to surgical patients at OSF St. Francis Medical Center. As testament to his successes in the field, Dr. Mark Holterman has earned several awards, including the Innovative Research Award from the American Diabetes Association, an organization committed to funding research into diabetes cures and prevention measures.

The American Diabetes Association offers two research awards to professionals: the Innovative Basic Science (IBS) award and the Innovative Clinical or Translational Science (ICTS) award.

Available to faculty members at any level, the IBS award is given to basic research that presents an innovative and new hypothesis. These hypotheses must be related to the pathophysiology or etiology of diabetes and demonstrate significant progress in terms of advancing diabetes treatment and prevention. The organization specifically encourages high-risk projects that have a larger potential for producing high-impact results.

Eligible applicants are authorized to work in the United States, and IBS award recipients receive up to $115,000 per year for a maximum of three years.

Meanwhile, the ICTS award grants recipients $200,000 per year for up to three years. This award is also limited to professionals who are authorized to work in the country, and it is given to research that presents innovative hypotheses and demonstrates a high probability of high-impact results. However, ICTS award recipient research must directly involve human data, samples, or subjects.