Mark J. Holterman, Medical

ADA Praises Congress for Funding Special Diabetes Program

 

Research Awards pic
American Diabetes Association
Image: professional.diabetes.org

With three decades of experience as a physician and an educator, Mark Holterman, MD, serves as a professor of medicine at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. In addition to his work as an educator, Dr. Mark Holterman engages with such organizations as the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

The ADA recently praised the federal government for agreeing to fund the Special Diabetes Program (SDP) to the tune of $600 million. SDP is one of the major drivers of research into type 1 diabetes and how to prevent type 2 diabetes for American Indians across the country. Thanks to this new funding, researchers will be able to continue exploring new treatments for diabetes in these communities, which are at exceptionally high risk of developing the disease.

The ADA recognized the Diabetes Caucuses in both houses of Congress for their work in helping this funding package come to fruition. The organization says it will continue to work with lawmakers to ensure that programs such as SDP continue to receive the support they need.

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Mark J. Holterman, Medical

American Diabetes Association Issues Joint Guidance on CGMs

 

American Diabetes Association pic
American Diabetes Association
Image: diabetes.org

Possessing decades of experience as both a physician and an educator, Mark Holterman, MD, serves as a professor of medicine at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. In addition to his work educating students, Dr. Mark Holterman is a longtime supporter of the American Diabetes Association.

Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems provide people with diabetes real-time feedback about changes in their blood sugar levels. This helps them decide whether or not to eat different things or integrate some exercise into their daily routines. Even though these devices offer significant benefits to patients, they are not used as much as they could be, because a lack of standardized guidelines exist on how they should be prescribed. That’s why the American Diabetes Association has partnered with the European Association for the Study of Diabetes to issue a joint statement called “Improving the Clinical Value and Utility of CGM Systems: Issues and Recommendations.”

The new statement provides recommendations on marketing, clinical data reporting, and regulatory guidance, among other items. It can be found in the December 2017 edition of Diabetes Care and is based on a comprehensive examination of 50-plus scientific articles about CGMs.

Mark J. Holterman, Medical

Research Awards at the American Diabetes Association

 

Research Awards pic
Research Awards
Image: professional.diabetes.org

Mark Holterman, MD, has worked for more than two decades building a career as an accomplished researcher and medical practitioner. Before taking on his current role as professor of surgery and pediatrics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, Dr. Mark Holterman received the Innovative Research Award from the American Diabetes Association  (ADA).

Over the last six decades, ADA has supported nearly 5,000 research initiatives in the field of diabetes through grant funding and dedicated research programming. The Core Research Program is one such avenue through which the organization supports diabetes researchers. In 2017, ADA recognized groundbreaking study in this field with its two Innovative Research Awards.

ADA’s Innovative Basic Science (IBS) Award helps fund work in the field of diabetes etiology and the challenges it poses to treatment efforts. The award gives special consideration to those researchers who are either working on early-stage studies or are poised to make great impact with their work. At the most, the IBS Award provides $115,000 in funding each year for a maximum of three years.

Another Core Program award is the Innovative Clinical or Translational Science (ICTS) Grant, which can supply faculty researchers with up to $200,000 in annual funding over a three-year period. This award focuses primarily on researchers who have applied their medical theories in clinical applications that use humans as research subjects.

Mark J. Holterman, Medical

The American Diabetes Association’s Two Research Awards

 

American Diabetes Association pic
American Diabetes Association
Image: diabetes.org

Mark Holterman, MD, has practiced pediatric surgery and studied regenerative medicine for several years. The CEO of Mariam Global Health, he splits his time between medical research, teaching surgery at the University of Illinois, and providing pediatric care to surgical patients at OSF St. Francis Medical Center. As testament to his successes in the field, Dr. Mark Holterman has earned several awards, including the Innovative Research Award from the American Diabetes Association, an organization committed to funding research into diabetes cures and prevention measures.

The American Diabetes Association offers two research awards to professionals: the Innovative Basic Science (IBS) award and the Innovative Clinical or Translational Science (ICTS) award.

Available to faculty members at any level, the IBS award is given to basic research that presents an innovative and new hypothesis. These hypotheses must be related to the pathophysiology or etiology of diabetes and demonstrate significant progress in terms of advancing diabetes treatment and prevention. The organization specifically encourages high-risk projects that have a larger potential for producing high-impact results.

Eligible applicants are authorized to work in the United States, and IBS award recipients receive up to $115,000 per year for a maximum of three years.

Meanwhile, the ICTS award grants recipients $200,000 per year for up to three years. This award is also limited to professionals who are authorized to work in the country, and it is given to research that presents innovative hypotheses and demonstrates a high probability of high-impact results. However, ICTS award recipient research must directly involve human data, samples, or subjects.