Mark J. Holterman, Medical

The Potential of Regenerative Medicine to Restore Organ Function

 

Dr. Mark J. Holterman pic
Dr. Mark J. Holterman
Image: osfhealthcare.org

Dr. Mark Holterman, a longtime advocate of regenerative medicine and stem cell therapy, serves as pediatrics professor at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria. Reflecting decades of research employing ethically sourced fetal stem cells, Mark J. Holterman, MD, seeks to promote the academic study of the safety and efficacy of innovative treatment modalities.

An emerging area of medical science, regenerative medicine at its foundation centers on restoring the functionality of organs and tissues, specifically those that have been damaged or are associated with chronic disease and severe injuries that do not respond to conventional therapies. Restoration of function is enabled through a combination of tissue engineering and gene editing advancements, which allows stem cells to be remodeled as three-dimensional tissue structures and organoids that meet highly specific needs.

Enabling this is the potentially limitless ability of stem cells to divide and transdifferentiate into a variety of cell types. As such, stem cells provide a foundation for the body’s full range of organs and tissues. Employing microengineering and cell transplantation techniques, organoids are grown that have the potential to take the place of donated organs and tissues, which are of limited supply and expensive.

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Mark J. Holterman, Medical

Three Patient Benefits of Cellular Therapies

 

Mark J Holterman
Mark J Holterman

A pediatric surgeon with more than two decades of experience, Mark Holterman, MD, teaches medical students and residents at the University of Illinois College of Medicine and serves as the chief medical officer for Mariam Global Health. Dr. Mark Holterman also maintains an interest in stem cell therapy and has published numerous articles on the subject. Stem cell therapies offer multiple benefits to patients, as outlined below.

1. Treats a wide range of conditions. From cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases to orthopedic injuries, cellular therapies can treat a broad spectrum of medical conditions. Research indicates that cellular therapies can help stimulate the repair and growth of blood vessel tissues surrounding the heart and offer relief from degenerative symptoms associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Medical researchers also suspect that adult stem cells may possess the ability to help patients with autoimmune diseases and diabetes.

2. Promotes wound healing. Stem cell therapy accelerates tissue growth and boosts the body’s production of collagen, a protein found in skin, muscles, bones, blood vessels, and the digestive system that strengthens skin and replaces dead cells. The increase of collagen concentration tightens damaged tissue and reduces scars by growing healthy tissue.

3. Improved success for transplants. Cellular therapies give patients the option to transplant cells from one area of their body to another, which decreases the possibility of a rejection response.

Mark J. Holterman, Medical

Cellular Therapy FAQs

 

Alliance for the Advancement of Cellular Therapies pic
Alliance for the Advancement of Cellular Therapies
Image: aact.co

Mark Holterman, MD, PhD, teaches surgery and pediatrics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. As a cofounder of the Alliance for the Advancement of Cellular Therapies (AACT), Dr. Mark Holterman promotes the safe and ethical advancement of regenerative medicine and stem-cell therapies. The following addresses some frequently asked questions about cellular therapies.

Q: What are cellular therapies?

A: Cellular therapy (CT) entails transplanting human cells to enhance the body’s ability to fight disease and restore tissue and cells. When the body is injured, its adult stem cells activate, traveling to the site of the injury and giving signals to start the healing process. With age, the number of these cells decreases. However, with CT, stem cells are taken from bone marrow or fat and implanted at the injured or diseased site when there is an inadequate supply.

Q: For what diseases can cellular therapies be used?

A: Some diseases that cellular therapies may be used for are osteoarthritis and joint pain, autoimmune disorders, alopecia, and psoriasis.

Q: Are cellular therapies ethical?

A: There are no ethical issues involved in adult stem-cell therapy since they are not embryonic stem cells.